DOT Random Drug Testing Kansas

  • Local DOT Random Drug Testing Kansas



  • Quantity:

  • (Includes Enrollment Certificate, Random Selections, Notifications & MIS Reports.)

  • FMCSA, FAA, FRA, FTA, PHSMA
    Price: $99.99 Quantity:
  • Price: $99.99 Quantity:
  • Price: $69.99 Quantity:
  • Price: $99.99
  • Price: $129.99 Quantity:
  • Price: $129.99 Quantity:
  • Price: $199.99 Quantity:
  • Price: $19.99 Quantity:
  • Price: $49.99 Quantity:
  • Includes - (1) Drug Test, (1) Consortium Membership, (1) Supervisor Training, (1) DOT Drug Policy (1) MVR Report & Certificate of Compliance
    Price: $399.99 Quantity:
  • $0.00

DOT Random Drug Testing Kansas

DOT Random Drug Testing Kansas

DOT Drug Testing USA provides DOT Random Drug Testing Kansas at testing center locations throughout your State DOT Drug Testing USA centers are located within minutes of your home or office and same day service is available at most testing centers throughout the State of Kansas.

To schedule DOT Random Drug Testing Kansas or to join the DOT random pool/consortium, Call (800)579-8083

In addition to DOT Random Drug Testing Kansas we also provide DOT breath alcohol testing, DOT consortium membership, DOT supervisor training and DOT drug policy development.

As an employee regulated by DOT you are subject to unannounced random drug & alcohol testing. Alcohol testing is administered just prior to, during or just after performing safety-sensitive functions. Depending on the industry specific regulations, you may only be subject to random drug testing.7 7 USCG & PHMSA do not perform random alcohol tests. DOT Random Drug TestingNo manager, supervisor, official or agent may select you for testing just because they want to. Under DOT regulations, employers must use a truly random selection process. Each employee must have an equal chance to be selected and tested. Just prior to the testing event, you will be notified of your selection and provided enough time to stop performing your safety-sensitive function and report to the testing location. Failure to show for a test or interfering with the testing process can be considered a refusal to test.

All safety sensitive employees must be a member of a DOT random selection pool/consortium in accordance with DOT Random Drug Testing Kansas selection percentages.

DOT Random Drug Testing Kansas is a 5 panel urine drug test which must be analyzed by a SAMHSA Certified Laboratory and verified by a Medical Review Officer. A DOT drug test screens for the following,

  • Amphetamines
  • Opiates
  • Cocaine
  • Phencyclidine (PCP)
  • Marijuana

mobile drug testing

 

DOT Agency Random Drug Testing Rate Random Alcohol Testing Rate
Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) 25% 10%
Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) 25% 10%
Federal Railroad Administration (FRA) 25% 10%
Federal Transit Administration (FTA) 25% 10%
Pipeline & Hazardous Materials Safety (PHMSA) 25% n/a
United States Coast Guard 25% n/a

 

To review the Department of Transportations (DOT) drug testing regulations including DOT Random Drug Testing Kansas – CLICK HERE

Avoid DOT fines and penalties, be complaint with all DOT drug and alcohol testing regulations including DOT random drug testing requirements. 

DOT Drug Testing USA can schedule your DOT Random Drug Testing Kansas, Call us today!

Become DOT Compliant Today!

DOT Drug Testing USA 

(800)579-8083

Did you Know?

Kansas is a U.S. state located in the Midwestern United States. It is named after the Kansa Native American tribe which inhabited the area. The tribe’s name is often said to mean “people of the wind” or “people of the south wind,” although this was probably not the term’s original meaning. Residents of Kansas are called “Kansans”. For thousands of years, what is now Kansas was home to numerous and diverse Native American tribes. Tribes in the eastern part of the state generally lived in villages along the river valleys. Tribes in the western part of the state were semi-nomadic and hunted large herds of bison. Kansas was first settled by European Americans in the 1830s, but the pace of settlement accelerated in the 1850s, in the midst of political wars over the slavery issue. When it was officially opened to settlement by the U.S. government in 1854, abolitionist Free-Staters from New England and pro-slavery settlers from neighboring Missouri rushed to the territory to determine whether Kansas would become a free state or a slave state. Thus, the area was a hotbed of violence and chaos in its early days as these forces collided, and was known as Bleeding Kansas. The abolitionists eventually prevailed and on January 29, 1861, Kansas entered the Union as a free state. After the Civil War, the population of Kansas grew rapidly when waves of immigrants turned the prairie into farmland. Today, Kansas is one of the most productive agricultural states, producing high yields of wheat, corn, sorghum, and soybeans. Kansas is the 15th most extensive and the 34th most populous of the 50 United States.
Kansas is bordered by Nebraska on the north; Missouri on the east; Oklahoma on the south; and Colorado on the west. The state is divided into 105 counties with 628 cities, and is located equidistant from the Pacific and Atlantic oceans. The geographic center of the 48 contiguous states is located in Smith County near Lebanon. Until 1989, the Meades Ranch Triangulation Station in Osborne County was the geodetic center of North America: the central reference point for all maps of North America. The geographic center of Kansas is located in Barton County. Kansas is underlain by a sequence of horizontal to gently westward dipping sedimentary rocks. A sequence of Mississippian, Pennsylvanian and Permian rocks outcrop in the eastern and southern part of the state. The western half of the state has exposures of Cretaceous through Tertiary sediments, the latter derived from the erosion of the uplifted Rocky Mountains to the west. These are underlain by older Paleozoic and Mesozoic sediments which correlate well with the outcrops to the east. The northeastern corner of the state was subjected to glaciation in the Pleistocene and is covered by glacial drift and loess.
For millennia, the land that is currently Kansas was inhabited by Native Americans. The first European to set foot in present-day Kansas was Francisco Vásquez de Coronado, who explored the area in 1541. In 1803, most of modern Kansas was secured by the United States as part of the Louisiana Purchase. Southwest Kansas, however, was still a part of Spain, Mexico and the Republic of Texas until the conclusion of the Mexican-American War in 1848. From 1812 to 1821, Kansas was part of the Missouri Territory. The Santa Fe Trail traversed Kansas from 1821 to 1880, transporting manufactured goods from Missouri and silver and furs from Santa Fe, New Mexico. Wagon ruts from the trail are still visible in the prairie today. In 1827, Fort Leavenworth became the first permanent settlement of white Americans in the future state. The Kansas–Nebraska Act became law on May 30, 1854, establishing the U.S. territories of Nebraska and Kansas, and opening the area to broader settlement by whites. Kansas Territory stretched all the way to the Continental Divide and included the sites of present-day Denver, Colorado Springs, and Pueblo. Missouri and Arkansas sent settlers into Kansas all along its eastern border. These settlers attempted to sway votes in favor of slavery. The secondary settlement of Americans in Kansas Territory were abolitionists from Massachusetts and other Free-States, who attempted to stop the spread of slavery from neighboring Missouri. Directly presaging the American Civil War, these forces collided, entering into skirmishes that earned the territory the name of Bleeding Kansas.