DOT Random Drug Testing Durham NH

  • Local DOT Random Drug Testing Durham NH



  • Quantity:

  • (Includes Enrollment Certificate, Random Selections, Notifications & MIS Reports.)

  • FMCSA, FAA, FRA, FTA, PHSMA
    Price: $99.99 Quantity:
  • Price: $99.99 Quantity:
  • Price: $69.99 Quantity:
  • Price: $99.99
  • Price: $129.99 Quantity:
  • Price: $129.99 Quantity:
  • Price: $199.99 Quantity:
  • Price: $19.99 Quantity:
  • Price: $49.99 Quantity:
  • Includes - (1) Drug Test, (1) Consortium Membership, (1) Supervisor Training, (1) DOT Drug Policy (1) MVR Report & Certificate of Compliance
    Price: $399.99 Quantity:
  • $0.00

DOT Random Drug Testing Durham NH

DOT Random Drug Testing Durham NH

DOT Drug Testing USA provides DOT Random Drug Testing at testing center locations in Durham NH and throughout the local area. Testing centers are located within minutes of your home or office and same day service is available at most testing centers in Durham NH.mobile drug testing

To schedule DOT Random Drug Testing Durham NH or to join the DOT random pool/consortium, Call (800)579-8083

In addition to DOT Random Drug Testing Durham NH we also provide DOT breath alcohol testing, DOT consortium membership, DOT supervisor training and DOT drug policy development.

As an employee regulated by DOT you are subject to unannounced random drug & alcohol testing. Alcohol testing is administered just prior to, during or just after performing safety-sensitive functions. Depending on the industry specific regulations, you may only be subject to random drug testing.7 7 USCG & PHMSA do not perform random alcohol tests. DOT Random Drug TestingNo manager, supervisor, official or agent may select you for testing just because they want to. Under DOT regulations, employers must use a truly random selection process. Each employee must have an equal chance to be selected and tested. Just prior to the testing event, you will be notified of your selection and provided enough time to stop performing your safety-sensitive function and report to the testing location. Failure to show for a test or interfering with the testing process can be considered a refusal to test.

All safety sensitive employees must be a member of a DOT random selection pool/consortium in accordance with DOT Random Drug Testing Durham NH selection percentages.

DOT Random Drug Testing Durham NH is a 5 panel urine drug test which must be analyzed by a SAMHSA Certified Laboratory and verified by a Medical Review Officer. A DOT drug test screens for the following,

 

  • Amphetamines
  • Opiates
  • Cocaine
  • Phencyclidine (PCP)
  • Marijuana

 

 

DOT Agency Random Drug Testing Rate Random Alcohol Testing Rate
Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) 25% 10%
Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) 25% 10%
Federal Railroad Administration (FRA) 25% 10%
Federal Transit Administration (FTA) 25% 10%
Pipeline & Hazardous Materials Safety (PHMSA) 25% n/a
United States Coast Guard 25% n/a

 

To review the Department of Transportations (DOT) drug testing regulations including DOT Random Drug Testing Durham NH – CLICK HERE

Avoid DOT fines and penalties, be complaint with all DOT drug and alcohol testing regulations including DOT random drug testing requirements. 

DOT Drug Testing USA can schedule your DOT Random Drug Testing Durham NH, Call us today!

Become DOT Compliant Today!

DOT Drug Testing USA 

(800)579-8083

Did you Know?

Durham is a town in Strafford County, New Hampshire, United States. The population was 14,638 at the 2010 census. Durham is home to the University of New Hampshire. The primary settlement in town, where 10,345 people resided at the 2010 census, is defined by the U.S. Census Bureau as the Durham census-designated place (CDP) and includes the densely populated portion of the town centered on the intersection of New Hampshire Route 108 and Main Street and including the university which dominates the town. According to the United States Census Bureau, the town has a total area of 24.8 square miles (64 km2), of which 22.4 sq. mi (58 km2) is land and 2.4 sq. mi (6.2 km2) is water, comprising 9.57% of the town. The town is drained by the Oyster River. The highest point in Durham is Beech Hill, at 291 feet (89 m) above sea level, located on the town’s northern border. Durham lies fully within the Piscataqua River (coastal) watershed. The village area of the town, defined as a census-designated place (CDP), has a total area of 2.7 sq. mi (7.0 km2), of which 0.1 sq. mi (0.26 km2) (1.85%) is water. Amtrak’s Downeaster train stops at Durham-UNH station with service to the Portland Transportation Center and Boston’s North Station.
Situated beside Great Bay at the mouth of the Oyster River, Durham was originally called Oyster River Plantation. It was settled in 1635 by pioneers who traveled up the Piscataqua River and across Little Bay to settle at the falls of the Oyster River. At the time, the land that is now New Hampshire belonged to Massachusetts; not until 1692 did the New Hampshire colony finally gain full and permanent independence from its southern neighbor. Most of the coastal area was divided among four townships, and for its first century, Durham was part of Dover. The village location was ideal for its fresh water, natural meadows for livestock, and the transportation opportunities afforded by the waterways leading to the Atlantic Ocean. The land along the river was quickly settled, and nearby dense forests provided the timber necessary to construct homes as well as boats. Oyster River Plantation took the form of a small agricultural village, and the first generation of residents worked to clear and shape the land for planting. The town is named after Durham, County Durham, England, from whence came two of its earliest settlers, William and Henry Hilton. They were two of four sons. Their father had lent King Charles of England money and he knew he would never get it back, so he offered to forgive the debt if Charles granted two of his son’s land in the New World. They arrived from England in a well-provisioned ship called the Providence.
During King William’s War, on July 18, 1694, the English settlement was attacked in the Raid on Oyster River by French career soldier Claude-Sébastien de Villieu with about 250 Abenaki from Norridgewock under command of their sagamore Bomazeen (or Bomoseen). In all, 104 inhabitants were killed and 27 taken captive, with half the dwellings, including the garrisons, pillaged and burned to the ground. The community would rebuild, however, and by 1716 Durham was a separate parish. Incorporated in 1732, Durham once included portions of the present-day towns of Madbury, Lee and Newmarket. Because of its arable land, the town would develop as a farming community.