DOT Random Drug Testing Superior WI

  • Local DOT Random Drug Testing Superior WI



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  • (Includes Enrollment Certificate, Random Selections, Notifications & MIS Reports.)

  • FMCSA, FAA, FRA, FTA, PHSMA
    Price: $99.99 Quantity:
  • Price: $99.99 Quantity:
  • Price: $69.99 Quantity:
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  • Price: $129.99 Quantity:
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  • Price: $19.99 Quantity:
  • Price: $49.99 Quantity:
  • Includes - (1) Drug Test, (1) Consortium Membership, (1) Supervisor Training, (1) DOT Drug Policy (1) MVR Report & Certificate of Compliance
    Price: $399.99 Quantity:
  • $0.00

DOT Random Drug Testing Superior WI

DOT Random Drug Testing Superior WI

DOT Drug Testing USA provides DOT Random Drug Testing at testing center locations in Superior WI and throughout the local area. Testing centers are located within minutes of your home or office and same day service is available at most testing centers in Superior WI.mobile drug testing

To schedule DOT Random Drug Testing Superior WI or to join the DOT random pool/consortium, Call (800)579-8083

In addition to DOT Random Drug Testing Superior WI we also provide DOT breath alcohol testing, DOT consortium membership, DOT supervisor training and DOT drug policy development.

As an employee regulated by DOT you are subject to unannounced random drug & alcohol testing. Alcohol testing is administered just prior to, during or just after performing safety-sensitive functions. Depending on the industry specific regulations, you may only be subject to random drug testing.7 7 USCG & PHMSA do not perform random alcohol tests. DOT Random Drug TestingNo manager, supervisor, official or agent may select you for testing just because they want to. Under DOT regulations, employers must use a truly random selection process. Each employee must have an equal chance to be selected and tested. Just prior to the testing event, you will be notified of your selection and provided enough time to stop performing your safety-sensitive function and report to the testing location. Failure to show for a test or interfering with the testing process can be considered a refusal to test.

All safety sensitive employees must be a member of a DOT random selection pool/consortium in accordance with DOT Random Drug Testing Superior WI selection percentages.

DOT Random Drug Testing Superior WI is a 5 panel urine drug test which must be analyzed by a SAMHSA Certified Laboratory and verified by a Medical Review Officer. A DOT drug test screens for the following,

 

  • Amphetamines
  • Opiates
  • Cocaine
  • Phencyclidine (PCP)
  • Marijuana

 

 

DOT Agency Random Drug Testing Rate Random Alcohol Testing Rate
Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) 25% 10%
Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) 25% 10%
Federal Railroad Administration (FRA) 25% 10%
Federal Transit Administration (FTA) 25% 10%
Pipeline & Hazardous Materials Safety (PHMSA) 25% n/a
United States Coast Guard 25% n/a

 

To review the Department of Transportations (DOT) drug testing regulations including DOT Random Drug Testing Superior WI – CLICK HERE

Avoid DOT fines and penalties, be complaint with all DOT drug and alcohol testing regulations including DOT random drug testing requirements. 

DOT Drug Testing USA can schedule your DOT Random Drug Testing Superior WI, Call us today!

Become DOT Compliant Today!

DOT Drug Testing USA 

(800)579-8083

Did you Know?

Superior is a city in, and the county seat of, Douglas County in the state of Wisconsin. The population was 27,244 at the 2010 census. Located at the junction of U.S. Highway 2 and U.S. Highway 53, it is immediately north of and adjacent to both the Village of Superior and the Town of Superior. Its neighborhoods include Billings Park, North End, South Superior, Central Park, East End, Allouez, and Itasca. Billings Park, South Superior, East End, and North End each have small business districts. Superior is at the western end of Lake Superior in northwestern Wisconsin. Bordered by Saint Louis, Superior, and Allouez bays, the city is framed by two rivers: The Nemadji and the Saint Louis. Superior and the neighboring city across the bay, Duluth, Minnesota, form a single metropolitan area called the Twin Ports. They share a harbor that is one of the most important ports on the Great Lakes. Both cities have museum ships (SS William a Irvin in Duluth and SS Meteor in Superior) devoted to the local maritime heritage. Superior was the last port of call for the Edmund Fitzgerald before its sinking in 1975. According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 55.65 square miles (144.13 km2), of which, 36.96 square miles (95.73 km2) is land and 18.69 square miles (48.41 km2) is water. 46.713385°N 92.087746°W) Most of Superior is level with a gradual slope toward Lake Superior. There are several parks in the city, including the second largest municipal forest in the United States, located in the city’s Billings Park neighborhood. Pattison State Park is a short distance south of the city, and contains Big Manitou Falls, the highest waterfall in the state at 165 feet (50 m).
The first-known inhabitants of what is now Douglas County Were Mound Builders. These people appeared on the shores of Lake Superior sometime after the latest glacier receded. They mined copper in the Minong Range and at Manitou Falls on the Black River. They pounded this metal into weapons, implements, and ornaments, some of which were later found buried as grave goods in mounds with their dead. Their civilization was eventually overrun by other tribes, mainly of Muskhogean and Iroquois stock, and they disappeared as a distinct culture in late prehistoric American times. About the time of the European arrival, the Duluth–Superior region transitioned from being predominately Dakota to being predominately Ojibwa/Chippewa (Anishinaabe), one of the many Algonquian language people. Under pressure from the Ojibwa, the Dakota moved west. In the Ojibwa oral history, Spirit Island in the Saint Louis River was their “Sixth Stopping Place,” where the northern and southern divisions of the Ojibwa nation came together in their westward migration. The City of Superior in the Ojibwe language is called Gete-oodena, meaning “Old Town.” The Lake Superior Chippewa continued to migrate, with many settling to the east toward Madeline Island, the “Seventh Stopping Place.” The Mississippi Chippewa migrated toward what is today Brainerd, Minnesota. (The two populations called both the settlements at Bayfield, Wisconsin and Brainerd as Oshki-oodena (“New Town”) in the Ojibwe language).
The first-known Europeans to visit the area were French. In 1618, Étienne Brûlé, a voyager for Samuel de Champlain, coasted along the south shore of Lake Superior where he met the Ojibwa. Upon returning to Quebec, he carried back some copper specimens and a glowing account of the region. In 1632, Champlain’s map was made of the area, showing “Lac Superior de Tracy” as Lake Superior and the lower end shore as “Fond du Lac.” Soon after, fur trading companies established posts, while Jesuit missionaries came to convert and learn from the Anishinaabe. For more than a century, the Hudson’s Bay Company, followed by the North West Company in 1787 and later, John Jacob Astor’s American Fur Company, maintained trading posts with the Anishinaabe, exchanging European tools and goods for their furs and processed leathers. Settlements developed around the trading posts. Many fur traders, the capitalized partners, married high-ranking Ojibwa women; both sides considered such marriages part of building alliances between the cultures. Fur trappers, who lived among the Ojibwa for months at a time and ranged throughout their territory, also married Ojibwa women. Their mixed-race children were called Métis by the French Canadians. Many of the men also entered the fur trade, becoming interpreters and guides as well.