DOT Random Drug Testing Waukesha WI

  • Local DOT Random Drug Testing Waukesha WI



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  • (Includes Enrollment Certificate, Random Selections, Notifications & MIS Reports.)

  • FMCSA, FAA, FRA, FTA, PHSMA
    Price: $99.99 Quantity:
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  • Price: $69.99 Quantity:
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  • Price: $129.99 Quantity:
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  • Price: $199.99 Quantity:
  • Price: $19.99 Quantity:
  • Price: $49.99 Quantity:
  • Includes - (1) Drug Test, (1) Consortium Membership, (1) Supervisor Training, (1) DOT Drug Policy (1) MVR Report & Certificate of Compliance
    Price: $399.99 Quantity:
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DOT Random Drug Testing Waukesha WI

DOT Random Drug Testing Waukesha WI

DOT Drug Testing USA provides DOT Random Drug Testing at testing center locations in Waukesha WI and throughout the local area. Testing centers are located within minutes of your home or office and same day service is available at most testing centers in Waukesha WI.mobile drug testing

To schedule DOT Random Drug Testing Waukesha WI or to join the DOT random pool/consortium, Call (800)579-8083

In addition to DOT Random Drug Testing Waukesha WI we also provide DOT breath alcohol testing, DOT consortium membership, DOT supervisor training and DOT drug policy development.

As an employee regulated by DOT you are subject to unannounced random drug & alcohol testing. Alcohol testing is administered just prior to, during or just after performing safety-sensitive functions. Depending on the industry specific regulations, you may only be subject to random drug testing.7 7 USCG & PHMSA do not perform random alcohol tests. DOT Random Drug TestingNo manager, supervisor, official or agent may select you for testing just because they want to. Under DOT regulations, employers must use a truly random selection process. Each employee must have an equal chance to be selected and tested. Just prior to the testing event, you will be notified of your selection and provided enough time to stop performing your safety-sensitive function and report to the testing location. Failure to show for a test or interfering with the testing process can be considered a refusal to test.

All safety sensitive employees must be a member of a DOT random selection pool/consortium in accordance with DOT Random Drug Testing Waukesha WI selection percentages.

DOT Random Drug Testing Waukesha WI is a 5 panel urine drug test which must be analyzed by a SAMHSA Certified Laboratory and verified by a Medical Review Officer. A DOT drug test screens for the following,

 

  • Amphetamines
  • Opiates
  • Cocaine
  • Phencyclidine (PCP)
  • Marijuana

 

 

DOT Agency Random Drug Testing Rate Random Alcohol Testing Rate
Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) 25% 10%
Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) 25% 10%
Federal Railroad Administration (FRA) 25% 10%
Federal Transit Administration (FTA) 25% 10%
Pipeline & Hazardous Materials Safety (PHMSA) 25% n/a
United States Coast Guard 25% n/a

 

To review the Department of Transportations (DOT) drug testing regulations including DOT Random Drug Testing Waukesha WI – CLICK HERE

Avoid DOT fines and penalties, be complaint with all DOT drug and alcohol testing regulations including DOT random drug testing requirements. 

DOT Drug Testing USA can schedule your DOT Random Drug Testing Waukesha WI, Call us today!

Become DOT Compliant Today!

DOT Drug Testing USA 

(800)579-8083

Did you Know?

Waukesha is a city in and the county seat of Waukesha County, Wisconsin. A suburb of Milwaukee, it is part of the Milwaukee metropolitan area. Its population was 70,718 at the 2010 census. The city is adjacent to the Town of Waukesha. Waukesha is located near the center of Waukesha County in southeastern Wisconsin, 18 miles (29 km) west of Milwaukee. Waukesha is also located 59 miles (95 km) east of Madison. The city shares borders with City of Brookfield, Town of Brookfield, Genesee, New Berlin, City of Pewaukee, Village of Pewaukee, Town of Delafield and Town of Waukesha. According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 25.07 square miles (64.93 km2), of which 24.81 square miles (64.26 km2) is land and 0.26 square miles (0.67 km2) is water. The city is located on both sides of the Fox River, which starts near Menomonee Falls and flows into the Illinois River. The Köppen-Geiger climate classification system classifies its climate as humid continental (Dfa).
The area that Waukesha now encompasses was first settled by Europeans in 1834, with Morris D. Cutler as its first settler. When the first settlers arrived, there was nothing but dense virgin forest and wild prairie. The settlers laid out farms, constructed roads, erected government buildings and established post routes. By 1846, the area was incorporated as the village of Prairieville. On February 8, 1847, the village changed its name to, “Waukesha,”[6] and in 1896, incorporated as a city. The first appointed mayor of the newly incorporated city of Waukesha was John Brehm, who served from January to April, 1896. Over the years, many believed, incorrectly, that the origin of the name of the city was an Algonquian word meaning “fox” or “little foxes,” though it is actually an Anglicization of the Ojibwe proper name Waagoshag or the Potawatomi name Wau-tsha. Wau-tsha (sometimes written as Wauk-tsha[10] or Wauke-tsha) was the leader of the local tribe at the time of the first European settlement of the area. This is confirmed by accounts of Increase A. Lapham, an early settler and historian of the region. According to Lapham, the word for “fox” was pishtaka. Cutler also told visitors about Wau-tsha, who was described as “tall and athletic, proud in his bearing, dignified and friendly.
Matthew Laflin, an early pioneer of Chicago, Illinois, provided the capital and enterprise that laid the foundation for Waukesha as a famous Wisconsin watering resort and was the proprietor of the grand resort, the Fountain Spring House. Waukesha was once known for its extremely clean and good-tasting spring water and was called a, “spa town.” This earned the city the nicknames, “Spring City,” and, “Saratoga of the West.” According to author Kristine Adams Wendt, in 1868, Colonel Richard Dunbar, a sufferer of diabetes, chanced upon the medicinal properties of what he later named the Bethesda Spring while viewing a parcel of land recently purchased by his sister. Testimonials found in a Dunbar brochure of 1873 proclaimed the miraculous benefits. Wendt reports that by 1872, “area newspapers carried accounts of a community ill equipped to handle its new popularity among the suffering multitudes. The semi-weekly Wisconsin (Milwaukee) of July 31, 1872, reported ‘that fully 500 visitors are quartered in hotels and scattered in private families here, seeking benefit from the marvelous waters…'” The “healing waters” were so valued that a controversial attempt was made to build a pipeline between the city and Chicago so that they could be enjoyed by visitors to the 1893 Columbian Exposition. According to Time magazine, “the scheme had been conceived by one Charles Welsh who had been given the springs by his uncle, but after several miles of pipe were laid, it was discovered that the cost was too great.”