DOT Drug Testing Halawa HI

  • Local DOT Drug Testing Halawa HI



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  • (Includes Enrollment Certificate, Random Selections, Notifications & MIS Reports.)

  • FMCSA, FAA, FRA, FTA, PHSMA
    Price: $99.99 Quantity:
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  • Price: $69.99 Quantity:
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  • Price: $49.99 Quantity:
  • Includes - (1) Drug Test, (1) Consortium Membership, (1) Supervisor Training, (1) DOT Drug Policy (1) MVR Report & Certificate of Compliance
    Price: $399.99 Quantity:
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DOT Drug Testing Halawa HI

DOT Drug Testing Halawa HI

DOT drug testing Halawa HI is provided by DOT Drug Testing USA for DOT required drug testing and alcohol testing at testing centers in Halawa HI and throughout the local area in compliance with Part 40 of the Department of Transportation’s drug and alcohol compliance program. DOT drug testing Halawa HI centers are located within minutes of your home or office and same day service is available in most cases.

In addition, to our DOT drug testing Halawa HI services, DOT Drug Testing USA offers a DOT required random testing/consortium program, DOT supervisor training and DOT written drug policy.

To schedule a DOT drug test or join the DOT random testing program, Call (800) 579-8083.

DOT drug testing Halawa HI locations provide DOT pre-employment, random, post-accident, reasonable suspicion and return to duty testing.

If you are a CDL/Single operator or a small trucking company, DOT Drug Testing USA has a complete DOT complete compliance package which includes all the requirements to comply with part 40. Call DOT Drug Testing USA for details.

On the road and need a DOT drug or alcohol test? No worries!, Call DOT Drug Testing USA  and we can schedule your test at one of our many DOT drug testing locations nationwide (800) 579-8083. 

All DOT Drug Testing USA DOT drug testing Halawa HI centers utilize SAMHSA Certified laboratories and licensed Medical Review Officers as required by DOT regulations. DOT Pre-Employment Testing Halawa HI

The U.S Department of Transportation (DOT) requires that all DOT regulated “safety sensitive” employees have on file a negative DOT pre-employment drug test result and be a member of a DOT approved random selection consortium. In addition, if a DOT regulated company has more than one “safety sensitive” employee, the employer must also have a written DOT drug and alcohol policy and an on-site supervisor must have completed supervisor training for reasonable suspicion of illegal drug use or impairment.

To be compliant with DOT regulations, a company’s DOT drug and alcohol testing program must have the following components.

 

  • Employee Drug Testing
  • Random Selection Program
  • Written Drug & Alcohol Policy
  • Post-Accident Testing
  • Supervisor Training
  • Designated Employer Representative
  • Substance Abuse Referral (SAP)
  • Federal Chain of Custody Forms
  • Employee Education
  • Regulations on File

The Department of Transportation (DOT) has specific drug and alcohol testing requirements for the following governmental agencies and DOT Drug Testing USA provides all testing services

Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) United States Coast Guard (USCG)
Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA)
Federal Transit Administration (FTA) Federal Railroad Administration (FRA)

DOT-Random-Drug-Testing Halawa HIDOT regulated companies with multiple safety sensitive employees must also have an employee within the company who is assigned as the “designated employer representative” (DER). This is the person responsible for removing any DOT “safety sensitive” employee who is covered by 49 CFR Part 40 from performing a DOT safety sensitive position when a positive drug or alcohol test result has occurred or an employee has refused to take a required DOT test.

If you have recently become a DOT regulated company, within the next 18 months the Department of Transportation (DOT) will conduct a “new entrant” inspection to ensure that you are in compliance with all DOT regulations including the drug and alcohol testing requirements. If you are currently a DOT regulated company you are subject to regular inspections to ensure compliance.

Avoid DOT fines and penalties, be complaint with all DOT drug and alcohol testing regulations!

DOT Drug Testing USA can assist small, medium and large DOT companies in complying with all requirements of 49 CFR Part 40. Call our DOT drug testing Halawa HI centers Today!

Become DOT Compliant Today!

DOT Drug Testing USA 

(800)579-8083

Did you Know?

Halawa is a census-designated place (CDP) in the ‘Ewa District of Honolulu County, Hawaii, United States. Halawa Stream branches into two valleys: North and South Halawa; North Halawa is the larger stream and fluvial feature. Their confluence is within the H-3/H-201 highways exchange. Most of Halawa Valley is undeveloped. As of the 2010 Census, the CDP had a population of 14,014. Halawa is located at 21°22′39″N 157°55′22″W (21.377633, -157.922759). According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 2.3 square miles (6.0 km2), all land. The route of H-3 extends from its western terminus with east-west Moanalua Freeway (H-201; connecting eastward to Honolulu or westward to H-1 and Aiea) to the 1100-foot (335-m) elevation entrance into the Tetsuo Harano Tunnels, penetrating the Ko‘olau crest. The freeway continues beyond to Kaneohe on windward Oahu. A significant proportion of H-3 within the valley is carried on a viaduct; although very expensive to construct, the viaduct is the only way to construct a freeway of this magnitude through such a narrow valley without flooding and destabilization concerns; it is also believed to offer some returns in terms of preservation of both archeological sites and stream ecology.
The entire ahupuaʻa of Halawa is highly sacred to Kanaka Maoli. At the far Makai (ocean) side at Puʻuloa or Pearl Harbor, it is, according to Kanaka Maoli beliefs, the home of the shark goddess Kaʻahupahau, known as the “Queen of Sharks”, who protected Oʻahu and strictly enforced kind, fair behavior on the part of both sharks and humans. Until the late 1890s, the home of Kaʻahupahau was famously lined with beds of pearl oysters, however, according to Kanaka Maoli religious experts who follow the goddess, Kaʻahupahau removed all of the oysters (and some say, herself) because the area was being abused by human misdeeds. Today, the water of Pearl Harbor has been highly contaminated by nuclear defueling and other toxic influences, and has thereby been designated as a Superfund site. The upland, or Mauka, portion of Halawa is sacred to Papahānaumoku, the Kanaka Maoli form of Mother Earth, as it is, according to legend, her birthplace and primary home, as well as one of only two or three known remaining Hale o Papa, womenʻs temples where Papa is worshipped. The valley contains many religious and other cultural sites sacred to Kanaka Maoli. Although many sites were destroyed by the invasion of Kahekili II and especially by the building of the highly controversial H-3 Freeway, many remain and are cared for by Kanaka Maoli Aloha ʻAina practitioners to this day.
In the last two decades, North Halawa has been the site of a very public battle over the religious sites and ecological resources destroyed by H-3, which is the most expensive freeway per mile in human history. At least two species were driven to probable extinction (none have been sighted since construction began), many more are declining rapidly, the main aquifer of the area was badly damaged, and religious sites were seriously impacted. Although the freeway was opened in 1997, many are still fighting for mitigation of these impacts, and some are asking for the freewayʻs closure. In 1993, thirteen cultural practitioners were arrested while conducting a ceremony to pray for the healing of the valley. Their lele (religious altar) was destroyed, and the caretakers of the area were barred from entrance to the sites. Today, some of these caretakers, many of them kupuna (elders), have returned to care for the sites, although they now do so through a layer of soot and with the roar of the freeway as a constant sonic backdrop. Many kanaka maoli do not use the freeway because of these impacts, and because of the lasting belief that the road is haunted—an often-attributed explanation for the high accident rate on the freeway (more generally believed to be caused by the high speeds often used by the motorists who traverse it).