DOT Drug Testing Laie HI

  • Local DOT Drug Testing Laie HI



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  • (Includes Enrollment Certificate, Random Selections, Notifications & MIS Reports.)

  • FMCSA, FAA, FRA, FTA, PHSMA
    Price: $99.99 Quantity:
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  • Price: $69.99 Quantity:
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  • Price: $49.99 Quantity:
  • Includes - (1) Drug Test, (1) Consortium Membership, (1) Supervisor Training, (1) DOT Drug Policy (1) MVR Report & Certificate of Compliance
    Price: $399.99 Quantity:
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DOT Drug Testing Laie HI

DOT Drug Testing Laie HI

DOT drug testing Laie HI is provided by DOT Drug Testing USA for DOT required drug testing and alcohol testing at testing centers in Laie HI and throughout the local area in compliance with Part 40 of the Department of Transportation’s drug and alcohol compliance program. DOT drug testing Laie HI centers are located within minutes of your home or office and same day service is available in most cases.

In addition, to our DOT drug testing Laie HI services, DOT Drug Testing USA offers a DOT required random testing/consortium program, DOT supervisor training and DOT written drug policy.

To schedule a DOT drug test or join the DOT random testing program, Call (800) 579-8083.

DOT drug testing Laie HI locations provide DOT pre-employment, random, post-accident, reasonable suspicion and return to duty testing.

If you are a CDL/Single operator or a small trucking company, DOT Drug Testing USA has a complete DOT complete compliance package which includes all the requirements to comply with part 40. Call DOT Drug Testing USA for details.

On the road and need a DOT drug or alcohol test? No worries!, Call DOT Drug Testing USA  and we can schedule your test at one of our many DOT drug testing locations nationwide (800) 579-8083. 

All DOT Drug Testing USA DOT drug testing Laie HI centers utilize SAMHSA Certified laboratories and licensed Medical Review Officers as required by DOT regulations. DOT Pre-Employment Testing Laie HI

The U.S Department of Transportation (DOT) requires that all DOT regulated “safety sensitive” employees have on file a negative DOT pre-employment drug test result and be a member of a DOT approved random selection consortium. In addition, if a DOT regulated company has more than one “safety sensitive” employee, the employer must also have a written DOT drug and alcohol policy and an on-site supervisor must have completed supervisor training for reasonable suspicion of illegal drug use or impairment.

To be compliant with DOT regulations, a company’s DOT drug and alcohol testing program must have the following components.

 

  • Employee Drug Testing
  • Random Selection Program
  • Written Drug & Alcohol Policy
  • Post-Accident Testing
  • Supervisor Training
  • Designated Employer Representative
  • Substance Abuse Referral (SAP)
  • Federal Chain of Custody Forms
  • Employee Education
  • Regulations on File

The Department of Transportation (DOT) has specific drug and alcohol testing requirements for the following governmental agencies and DOT Drug Testing USA provides all testing services

Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) United States Coast Guard (USCG)
Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA)
Federal Transit Administration (FTA) Federal Railroad Administration (FRA)

DOT-Random-Drug-Testing Laie HIDOT regulated companies with multiple safety sensitive employees must also have an employee within the company who is assigned as the “designated employer representative” (DER). This is the person responsible for removing any DOT “safety sensitive” employee who is covered by 49 CFR Part 40 from performing a DOT safety sensitive position when a positive drug or alcohol test result has occurred or an employee has refused to take a required DOT test.

If you have recently become a DOT regulated company, within the next 18 months the Department of Transportation (DOT) will conduct a “new entrant” inspection to ensure that you are in compliance with all DOT regulations including the drug and alcohol testing requirements. If you are currently a DOT regulated company you are subject to regular inspections to ensure compliance.

Avoid DOT fines and penalties, be complaint with all DOT drug and alcohol testing regulations!

DOT Drug Testing USA can assist small, medium and large DOT companies in complying with all requirements of 49 CFR Part 40. Call our DOT drug testing Laie HI centers Today!

Become DOT Compliant Today!

DOT Drug Testing USA 

(800)579-8083

Did you Know?

Laie is a census-designated place (CDP) located in the Koolauloa District on the island of Oahu in Honolulu County, Hawaii, United States. In Hawaiian, lāʻie means “ʻie leaf” (ʻieʻie is a climbing screwpine: Freycinetia arborea). The population was 6,138 at the 2010 census. Historically, Laie was a puʻuhonua, a sanctuary for fugitives. While a fugitive was in the pu’uhonua, it was unlawful for that fugitive’s pursuers to harm him or her. During wartime, spears with white flags attached were set up at each end of the city of refuge. If warriors attempted to pursue fugitives into the puʻuhonua, they would be killed by sanctuary priests. Fugitives seeking sanctuary in a city of refuge were not forced to permanently live within the confines of its walls. Instead, they were given two choices. In some cases, after a certain length of time (ranging from a couple of weeks to several years), fugitives could enter the service of the priests and assist in the daily affairs of the puʻuhonua. A second option was that after a certain length of time the fugitives would be free to leave and re-enter the world unmolested. Traditional cities of refuge were abolished in 1819.
Laie is located at 21°38′55″N 157°55′32″W (21.648500, -157.925569). Laie is located north of Hauula and south of Kahuku along Kamehameha Highway (State Rte. 83). According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 2.1 square miles (5.4 km2). 1.3 square miles (3.4 km2) of it is land and 0.9 square miles (2.3 km2) of it (40.65%) is water. The coastline is marked by Laie Point, a prominent lithified dune jutting out into the ocean. Two other lithified dunes (Kukuihoolua and Mokualai) lie just offshore of the point as scenic islets. Laie Beach Park was originally called Pahumoa Beach Park, after Pahumoa “John” Kamakeʻeʻāina (1879–1944), a fisherman from Lāʻie Maloʻo in the late 19th century and early 20th century who lived here and kept his nets on the beach adjacent to Kōloa Stream. He was well known in Lāʻie for his generosity and gave fish to everyone in the village, especially to those who could not fish for themselves. Pahumoa conducted many hukilau, a method of community net fishing. His family, the Kamakeʻeʻāinas, were a well-known fishing family in the area, and stories can still be found today of their abilities in fishing. To the south of town is Pounders Beach, named for the pounding shorebreak. The name change occurred in the 1950s, when a group of students at the Church College of the Pacific (now Brigham Young University–Hawaii) called the beach “Pounders” after the shorebreak that provided popular bodysurfing rides; the nickname stuck. Another bodysurfing beach is Hukilau Beach, located at the north end of town, at the mouth of Kahawainui Stream.
The history of Laie begins long before first contact. The name Laie is said to derive from two Hawaiian words: lau meaning “leaf”, and ie referring to the ʻieʻie (red-spiked climbing screwpine, Freycinetia arborea), which wreaths forest trees of the uplands or mauka regions of the mountains of the Koʻolau Range behind the community of Laie. In Hawaiian mythology, this red-spiked climbing screwpine is sacred to Kane, god of the earth, god of life, and god of the forests, as well as to Laka, the patron goddess of the hula. The name Laie becomes more environmentally significant through the Hawaiian oral history (kaʻao ) entitled Laieikawai. In this history, the term ikawai, which means “in the water”, also belongs to the food-producing tree called kalalaikawa. The kalalaikawa tree was planted in a place called Paliula’s garden, which is closely associated with the spiritual home, after her birth and relocation of Laieikawai. According to Hawaiian oral traditions, the planting of the kalalaikawa tree in the garden of Paliula is symbolic of the reproductive energy of male and female, which union in turns fills the land with offspring. From its close association with nature through its name, and through its oral traditions and history, the community of Laie takes upon itself a precise identification and a responsibility in perpetuating life and in preserving all life forms. Sometimes the land itself provided sanctuary for the Hawaiian people. Laie was such a place. The earliest information about Laie states that it was a small, sparsely populated village with a major distinction: “it was a city of refuge”. Within this city of refuge were located at least two heiau, traditional Hawaiian temples, of which very little remains today. Moohekili heiau was destroyed, but its remains can be found in taro patches makai (seaward) of the LDS Church’s Laie Hawaii Temple. Towards the mountain (mauka), the remains of Nioi heiau can be found on a small ridge. All that is left of Nioi is a coral platform.