DOT Random Drug Testing Keene NH

  • Local DOT Random Drug Testing Keene NH



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  • (Includes Enrollment Certificate, Random Selections, Notifications & MIS Reports.)

  • FMCSA, FAA, FRA, FTA, PHSMA
    Price: $99.99 Quantity:
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  • Price: $69.99 Quantity:
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  • Price: $49.99 Quantity:
  • Includes - (1) Drug Test, (1) Consortium Membership, (1) Supervisor Training, (1) DOT Drug Policy (1) MVR Report & Certificate of Compliance
    Price: $399.99 Quantity:
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DOT Random Drug Testing Keene NH

DOT Random Drug Testing Keene NH

DOT Drug Testing USA provides DOT Random Drug Testing at testing center locations in Keene NH and throughout the local area. Testing centers are located within minutes of your home or office and same day service is available at most testing centers in Keene NH.mobile drug testing

To schedule DOT Random Drug Testing Keene NH or to join the DOT random pool/consortium, Call (800)579-8083

In addition to DOT Random Drug Testing Keene NH we also provide DOT breath alcohol testing, DOT consortium membership, DOT supervisor training and DOT drug policy development.

As an employee regulated by DOT you are subject to unannounced random drug & alcohol testing. Alcohol testing is administered just prior to, during or just after performing safety-sensitive functions. Depending on the industry specific regulations, you may only be subject to random drug testing.7 7 USCG & PHMSA do not perform random alcohol tests. DOT Random Drug TestingNo manager, supervisor, official or agent may select you for testing just because they want to. Under DOT regulations, employers must use a truly random selection process. Each employee must have an equal chance to be selected and tested. Just prior to the testing event, you will be notified of your selection and provided enough time to stop performing your safety-sensitive function and report to the testing location. Failure to show for a test or interfering with the testing process can be considered a refusal to test.

All safety sensitive employees must be a member of a DOT random selection pool/consortium in accordance with DOT Random Drug Testing Keene NH selection percentages.

DOT Random Drug Testing Keene NH is a 5 panel urine drug test which must be analyzed by a SAMHSA Certified Laboratory and verified by a Medical Review Officer. A DOT drug test screens for the following,

 

  • Amphetamines
  • Opiates
  • Cocaine
  • Phencyclidine (PCP)
  • Marijuana

 

 

DOT Agency Random Drug Testing Rate Random Alcohol Testing Rate
Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) 25% 10%
Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) 25% 10%
Federal Railroad Administration (FRA) 25% 10%
Federal Transit Administration (FTA) 25% 10%
Pipeline & Hazardous Materials Safety (PHMSA) 25% n/a
United States Coast Guard 25% n/a

 

To review the Department of Transportations (DOT) drug testing regulations including DOT Random Drug Testing Keene NH – CLICK HERE

Avoid DOT fines and penalties, be complaint with all DOT drug and alcohol testing regulations including DOT random drug testing requirements. 

DOT Drug Testing USA can schedule your DOT Random Drug Testing Keene NH, Call us today!

Become DOT Compliant Today!

DOT Drug Testing USA 

(800)579-8083

Did you Know?

Keene is a city in Cheshire County, New Hampshire, United States. The population was 23,409 at the 2010 census. It is the county seat of Cheshire County. Keene is home to Keene State College and Antioch University New England, and formerly hosted the state’s annual Pumpkin Fest. Keene is located at 42°56′01″N 72°16′41″W (42.9339, −72.2784). According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 37.6 square miles (97.4 km2). 37.3 sq mi (96.6 km2) of it is land and 0.2 sq mi (0.5 km2) of it is water, comprising 0.67% of the town. Keene is drained by the Ashuelot River. The highest point in Keene is the summit of Grays Hill in the city’s northwest corner, at 1,388 feet (423 m) above sea level. Keene is entirely within the Connecticut River watershed, with all of the city except for the northwest corner draining to the Connecticut via the Ashuelot River. State highways converge on Keene from nine directions. New Hampshire Route 9 leads northeast to Concord and west to Brattleboro, Vermont. Route 10 leads north to Newport and southwest to Northfield, Massachusetts. Route 12 leads northwest to Walpole and Charlestown and southeast to Winchendon, Massachusetts. Route 101 leads east to Peterborough and Manchester, Route 32 leads south to Swanzey and to Athol, Massachusetts, and Route 12A leads north to Surry and Alstead. A limited-access bypass used variously by Routes 9, 10, 12, and 101 passes around the north, west, and south sides of downtown. Keene is served by Dillant–Hopkins Airport, located just south of the city in Swanzey.
The community was granted as Upper Ashuelot in 1735 by Colonial Governor Jonathan Belcher to 63 settlers who paid five pounds each and whose properties were assigned by lot. Settled after 1736, it was intended to be a fort town protecting the Province of Massachusetts Bay during the French and Indian Wars. When the boundary between Massachusetts and New Hampshire was fixed in 1741 Upper Ashuelot became part of New Hampshire. During King George’s War, the village was attacked and burned by Indians. Colonists fled to safety, but would return to rebuild in the early 1750s. It was regranted to its inhabitants in 1753 by Governor Benning Wentworth, who renamed it Keene after Sir Benjamin Keene, English minister to Spain and a West Indies trader. Located at the center of Cheshire County, it became county seat in 1769. Land was set off for Sullivan and Roxbury, although Keene would annex 154 acres (0.62 km2) from Swanzey (formerly Lower Ashuelot).
Timothy Dwight, the Yale president who chronicled his travels, called the town “…one of the prettiest in New England.” Situated on an ancient lake bed surrounded by hills, the valley with fertile meadows was excellent for farming. The Ashuelot River provided water power for sawmills, gristmills and tanneries. After the railroad arrived in 1848, numerous other industries were established. Keene became a manufacturing center for wooden-ware, pails, chairs, sash, shutters, doors, pottery, glass, soap, woolen textiles, shoes, saddles, mowing machines, carriages and sleighs. It also had a brickyard and foundry. Keene was incorporated as a city in 1874, and by 1880 had a population of 6,784. New England manufacturing declined in the 20th century, however, particularly during the Great Depression. Keene is today a center for insurance, education and tourism. The city nevertheless retains a considerable inventory of fine Victorian architecture from its flush mill town era. An example is the Keene Public Library, which occupies a Second Empire mansion built about 1869 by manufacturer Henry Colony.